The pet peeves thread

New super Peeve. Amazon promoting self published books and then actually taking money to promote these illiterate pieces of garbage “written” without basic editing or any other form of quality screening. This could become its own rant thread but if you have accidentally ordered one you know where I’m coming from.

And apparently people can still buy a few good reviews there too…

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That coincides with a pet peeve of mine. I read plenty of articles now where the editor seems to have gone AWOL. I find grammar and spelling mistakes across many articles. Some of those are sports articles, some are politics, some are general news, etc. Where did the editors go? You know, the folks who are supposed to catch these mistakes.

There have been a few articles that I just gave up on reading because of such poor grammar and/or spelling. It’s not as bad in books, but man it is off putting sometimes.

No I don’t pretend to be a grammarian or spelling NAZI. I’m far from perfect in both areas.

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I’m with you. I see poor proof reading, actually it’s probably non-existent, in the Salt Lake Tribune a lot these days. The other day there was an article that actually confused, to/two and there/their. Everyone might get caught up in that with informal writing, especially with the generally incompetent autocorrect, but these are supposed to be pros.

I recently posted about “changing the calculus” in this thread. Here’s another one that was used in today’s Tribune: “Now they’re upping security.” We see “upping” used all the time, often in sports stories. It makes absolutely no sense to me. “Up,” is a direction. To say one is “upping” anything is akin to saying you are “easting” it or “north by northwesting” it. When there are appropriate alternatives like, “enhancing” or “increasing” available, I expect professional writers to use them.

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Correct. If one says “up yours”, you wouldn’t later say “he was upping yours”

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I prefer to use “knock yourself up.” Makes’em think.

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You don’t have to be so increasity about it.

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Oh, here are two more.

  • “very unique” – pretty sure “unique” says it all.
    ** “oftentimes” – hmmm, “often” already connotes frequency by itself.
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20221122_103623

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Oftentimes is a grammatically correct term though.

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You missed the chance to say, “oftentimes is oftentimes grammatically correct.”

I am disappoint.

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You certainly are.

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While I’m at it, two commonly used “words” by sports announcers: Trickeration and physicality. The first one is just nonsense. The word is “trickery.” They just spout “trickeration” because they think it’s either cute or makes them sound smart, when in fact neither is true. “Physicality” is actually a word, but it just seems to be an awkward way to say, “They’re more physical.”

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I know it’s accepted, but it still does not make sense to me. Hey, it’s a “pet peeves” thread. :slight_smile:

Yes, and to add to that, an oftentimes used reference to catching a football at it’s highest point. No. No, they did not.

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But how else are they going to matriculate the ball down the field?

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