The Things I Love Thread

Beautiful!

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Bob Black

I live contiguous to a private park that has several large Eucalyptus trees, I love hearing the owls hooting at night/early morning, which occurs once or twice a week. Soothing, peaceful. Among other things, it makes me feel like there is hope for the ecosystem. A few years ago I was informed by a neighbor that a resident who lived next to the park a couple hundred yards South of me used to shoot at them with a pellet gun. Thankfully the idiot moved.

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That phenomena is also what is referred to as an emergent property, sometimes when a significant number of specific entities coalesce an unforeseen property emerges. If you looked at an African termite all by itself, studied it forward and backward, you would not be able to predict that when hundreds (thousands?) blend together they build a five foot tall termite mound. My main point is, some people theorize this may be partially how the as yet explained phenomena of consciousness arrives, i.e., you connect billions of nerve cells … . Further discussion of the mind/body problem and consciousness is outside the scope of this thread.

“If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn’t!”

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Speaking of which, how about our unmatched culinary dominance?

Taco Bell announces over 12 new menu items for 2024 - Deseret News

And they report this on Valentine’s Day?

Brrriliant! (Scottish “r” there)

(cough)

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Can’t say that I’m a fan of Taco Bell, but some of those sound interesting.

They’d probably be more so if I were high.

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I can see both sides of this argument.

But there’s one thing about Starlings I think we can agree with them on - they don’t like, among other things, essential oils.

So, they may be good BS detectors.

17 Facts About Starlings [Eating Habits, Starling Life Cycle & More] (pestcentric.com)

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:smile::smile::smile:

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de Garde Brewing, F.H. Steinbart Company, Upright Brewing, Horse Brass Pub, and Belmont Station

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This one may sound strange due to the nature of workouts.

I love interval training. As my fitness improves, intervals don’t necessarily become easier. The recovery from them becomes faster. I can feel my fitness improve.

I don’t quite know how to explain why I enjoy intervals. Perhaps it has more to do with the end result versus the actual interval workout. Because during the interval I am suffering, my legs burn and ache, I’ve got sweat dripping onto my glasses or off my nose, or both. But I feel as if I’ve accomplished something when I’m done. There’s that immediate, “I did it.” Then there’s the over time “I just feel better”. Perhaps that’s the explanation, 2fer so to speak.

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Noam Chomsky

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You’re not imagining it.

The so-called runner’s high was thought to be the result of endorphins released during exercise - which certainly help as an natural analgesic in different areas of the body - but a researcher figured out the endorphin molecules are too big to go through the blood-brain barrier, so endorphins aren’t responsible for the feel good in the brain.

Some German researchers set out on a quest to resolve the mystery. Tada! A new molecule, the anandamide, produced by our internal endocannaboid system. (Ananda means “bliss” in sanscrit.)

New Brain Effects behind “Runner’s High” | Scientific American

Our endo-cannaboid system is stimulated by THC, but also releases opioid peptides that help women deal with childbirth, for example. One of those has been identified & named anadamide, a byproduct of intensive aerobic exercise.

“Runner’s High” Depends on Endocannabinoids (Not Endorphins) | Psychology Today

In their recent double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled human study, the German researchers recruited 63 healthy participants and had them run at “moderate-intensity” exertion levels on a laboratory treadmill for 45 minutes. During a separate treadmill session in an exercise lab, the same participants walked at a casual pace for 45 minutes.

On average, the researchers found that study participants “exhibited increased euphoria and decreased anxiety after 45 minutes of running on a treadmill in a moderate-intensity range compared to walking.”

They also found that running vs. walking led to higher plasma levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoglycerol (2-AG). Because this study was designed to investigate if the two core features of a runner’s high (euphoria and reduced anxiety levels) were dependent on opioid signaling, the researchers randomly used an opioid-receptor antagonist (naltrexone) to block these receptors.

Notably, runners who were given the opioid-receptor blocking naltrexone (which inhibits endorphins) still experienced exercise-induced euphoria and anxiolysis. “Opioid blockade did not prevent the development of euphoria and reduced anxiety as well as elevation of endocannabinoid levels following exercise,” the authors wrote in the paper’s abstract.

“This means endorphins don’t seem to play a major role [in runner’s high],” Fuss told Runner’s World. “We found, instead, that running stimulates endocannabinoid release, and based on our present and earlier findings, we conclude that endocannabinoids are responsible for a ‘runner’s high.’”

No need for gummys or the externally introduced THC.

You earned it - enjoy!

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I love salmon. I made it tonight with a chili lime seasoning. Outstanding. I love food in general which has been a problem. Implementing healthier habits now and I’m down 26 pounds. So I love that too.

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There’s always room for THC.

Ice cream. I know @LAUte agrees. When I’m in the mood it really hits the spot. As I’ve grown older I’ve decided that pistachio is my favorite. Yum.

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Stepping outside my house and looking around at Ogden Valley.

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Watching sunrises after a night of storminess. The clean views of the Wasatch from my side of the valley. Awesome

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Black licorice.

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